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Q&A with Carl Pendle – unearthed® food in film finalist

Carl Pendle - Joint 3rd place documentary winner of the unearthed food in film award 2014Carl Pendle was one of our Documentary winners of the unearthed® food in film award – a category of Pink Lady® Food Photographer of the Year 2014. His video Mushroom Hunting (scroll down to watch) is a lovely film, which features chef and mushroom forager Nik Westacott, out and about in the woods. We wanted to know what inspired Carl and how he got into food film-making.

Tell us a bit about yourself?
I’m a photographer and filmmaker specialising in food. That could be from producing a video for Waitrose for one of their suppliers to a coffee roaster to going abroad for a tourist board and filming something food related for them.

How long have you been working in the industry, what is your background?
I’ve been a freelancer for about 25 years. I started out as a Press photographer for the Birmingham Daily News and went from there.

What did you study at college/university?
I went to university in America on a tennis scholarship and studied photography as part of my degree

When did you first get into film?
When Canon came out with the Canon 5D MarkII I started to play around with filming then so about 7 years ago. I did my own films then offered them to clients who commissioned me to do photography. It’s now become part of my main job.

How did the film come about?
There is a man local to me who I’ve know for a long time. He used to run a very good restaurant in Chichester and then moved to owning a B&B business with a small restaurant as part of it. I contacted him as I knew he offered mushroom foraging days and he agreed to take me out.
Klaus Einwanger - Documentary winner of the unearthed® food in film award 2014
What was your inspiration?
Him really. He’s a great character and filming and cooking in the outdoors has immediate appeal to me.

How long did the film take to make?
It was full day of filming and two to three days of editing and colouring.

Who was on the team?
Just me.

What was the hardest/most difficult part about making the film?
I’d have to say trying to capture the light and atmosphere of the woods. To get that to come across in the video was my main goal.

Do you need any special equipment to make food films?
No not really. Just a good understanding of food and what you have to do to make it look its best. It helps that I’m a food photographer as well.

What gadget can you not do without when you’re photographing/filming?
I’d have to say my dolly slider and macro lens.

Where did you hear about the competition?
I’ve entered the Pink Lady Food photographer of the Year for the past couple of years and have been lucky to have been a finalist on both occasions so this year I saw there was a film category and went for it.

How has winning the competition helped your career?
It hasn’t, as yet, but it’s always nice to tell clients that you’ve won a few things.

And now, our foodie questions
What is your favourite dish?
I have a massive sweet tooth so lemon meringue pie I’m afraid.

What’s your most memorable meal?
My nan’s fish and chips. Every Thursday as a kid my Nan would make us fish and chips from her tiny kitchen. She used to own a fish and chip shop so they were very good. I’ve been lucky enough to eat all over the world but that would be my most memorable.

Where in the world would you most like to eat?
I’ve never been to Japan so would love to go there to sample the food. I also love sushi so what better place to sample it.


To find out more about Carl, visit his website: and you can also follow him on twitter @digitalshooter1

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Q&A with Klaus Einwanger – unearthed® food in film finalist

Klaus Einwanger - Documentary winner of the unearthed food in film award 2014Klaus Einwanger was announced as Documentary winner of the unearthed® food in film award – a category of Pink Lady® Food Photographer of the Year 2014. His video A Truly British Chef (scroll down to watch) is about cooking fish, with the thoughts of chef Adam Byatt, Trinity restaurant, featuring his head chef Graham Squire. We caught up with Klaus to talk about his career and what winning the award has meant.

Tell us a bit about yourself?
I was born in 1967 in Munich. I enjoyed a happy childhood with my twin and another brother. I’m married with three boys and I live on a small farm close to the Alps where we spend time skiing in the winter and hiking in the summer. As a close family my brothers, their wives and children continue to share birthdays, festivals and holidays together.

How long have you been working in the industry, what is your background?
I’ve worked in the film and photography business for 30 years. I started in 1984 age 17, as a young apprentice to an industrial photographer. Inspired by all the different options and opportunities I had in my first studio in 1990. My first portfolio was mainly still life images, later I moved to portraits and fashion. In 2002 I found my passion in food photography.

What did you study at college/university?
My career in photography was my university and I completed my AVCE studies in Art 1989. This was a requirement to progress in the profession. It was a big achievement for me at the time.

When did you first get into film?
I started filming 2009, it was a natural progression as a part of our studio business.

Is film your main job or a hobby?
At the present time, my main job still is food photography – but filming has more and more of my attention and an increasing part of my professional life.
Klaus Einwanger - Documentary winner of the unearthed® food in film award 2014
How did ‘A Truly British Chef’ come about?
I work a lot in London, especially with the London Chef– Patron Adam Byatt. In 2009 I photographed his first book and in 2013 we worked on a pilot of a TV series. During one of our “creative meetings” the idea popped up to film a series of short episodes about ingredients. From that point film always features in my thinking.

What was your inspiration?
The biggest inspiration is always to talk about the value of high quality food

How long did the film take to make?
The original filming was completed in one day. Supplementary filming and stills photography took another day.

Who was on the team?
Sebastian Riepp and Mario Feil did the camera work and the editing was done by Mario Feil

What was the hardest/most difficult part about making the film?
To find time slots for filming in the kitchen while normal business was running.

Do you need any special equipment to make food films?
We work with a RED epic – apart from that the relationship with the Chef and the film crew are most important.

What gadget can you not do without when you’re photographing/filming?
It has to be my camera – to capture moments and fulfil ideas

How did you hear about the unearthed® food in film category
I was happy to be a winner in two categories last year and so I was aware of the new category this year

How has winning the competition helped your career?
It helped a lot to build and establish an international reputation for myself, my film colleagues, and of course KME Studios.

And now, our foodie questions
What is your favourite dish?
Not easy to say, but I do love the Lancashire hotpot by Adam Byatt. Although it’s traditional in the North of England, the way Adam cooks it is wonderful.

What’s your most memorable meal
I am fortunate to enjoy incredible food at many top restaurants. One unforgettable meal was at the Dallmayr Restaurant, in Munich with the head chef Diethard Urbansky.

Where in the world would you most like to eat?
Restaurant Amador in Málaga, it would be a great experience.(we agree after seeing photos of it)


To find out more about Klaus, visit his website: and you can also follow KME Studios on twitter @kmestudios

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Q&A from Yuki Sugiura – unearthed® food in film winner

Back in April we announced that Yuki Sugiura was the winner of the unearthed® food in film winner with her beautiful animation ‘Florentines’- see it below. Well she has taken some time out of her busy schedule to have a chat to us about her inspiration for making the film and how she got started in film-making.

Tell us a bit about yourself? Yuki Sugiura - winner of the unearthed® food in film award 2014
I’m originally from Tokyo, but have been based in London for more than 12 years. I did a BA Joint Honours in Visual Arts, specialising in Ceramics and Graphic Design. I didn’t actually study photography, although got really into B&W photography in the dark room they had in the basement.

How long have you been working in the industry, what is your background?
After graduating college in 2000 I did a couple of months assisting a food photographer. I then returned to Japan where I worked in various industries, eventually getting some photographic commissions. Two years later I came back to London and freelanced as an assistant for nearly 5 years working for a number of top photographers in the food industry and other areas. I was even lucky enough to work with Tessa Treager (winner of the Pink Lady Food Photographer of the year 2014 lifetime award) on an advertising project ten years ago. I now mainly shoot food, interior and travel for UK, Japanese and American clients. But I love and am obsessed with food and cooking.

When did you first get into film?
Three years ago, making a series of cooking demo videos for a cookbook I shot with a TV chef Johnnie Mountain. It was my first time ever to film something so i had to learn and guess things as we went but with the help of a technical guy we managed well. This animation is the third film I’ve ever made and the second stop-motion. The first stop-motion was also for the Guardian, similar but simpler piece, showing a salad recipe. We learnt a lot from it.

Is film your main job or a hobby?
I’m a full-time still photographer but with a big interest in moving images. I would like to direct/make more films in the future, that’s for sure! About the entry How did the film come about? Rachel Vere, the picture editor of the Guardian wanted to make an animation to promote Cook and Ruby Tando’s baking column so they obtained funding from the Guardian Media.

How long did the film take to make?
Originally we booked 2 days to shoot (which is still short for the amount of work), but due to other commitments we only had 1 free day so we had to shoot in just that. We started at 8am and finished at 2am next morning (a solid 18 hours) with very few breaks. There was a a lot of prepping before filming, plus editing and music to be added. All in all, more than 4 weeks from the start to the finish, which is still quite quick!

Who was on the team? Yuki Sugiura and the team accept their food in film award from Jay Rayner and unearthed's Simon Day

  • Me, the photographer – setting the scene, shooting the cover, doing lighting and moving props
  • Lee, the animator – he made the original story board and edited the film
  • Rachel, the stylist and art direction – she came up with the feel of the story and got the props to go with it
  • Valerie the food stylist – she tested the recipe and prepared the food for each steps
  • Evan, sound designer – he put the music afterwards once the film was edited

We were all new to this so it was sometimes trial and error but we had such a great spirit of collaboration between us all. We had a storyboard to keep us on track but every single shot was discussed and spontaneously animated reflecting our opinions and suggestions. What was the hardest/most difficult part about making the film? Lack of time? If we had more time and money we could have paid more attention to details and add more cool moves to the Florentine – which were not the most visually easy thing to animate. Stop motion picture is a very slow process, but we did it super-fast because we were forced to

Do you need any special equipment to make animation films?
A camera, lights, computer, animation and editing programs. And a lot of patience, if doing stop motion pictures especially!

Any top tips for making animations?
You can do a lot with the simplest idea, but the concept/story is the most important part. And for me, it’s got to be fun and almost bit silly. A good sense of humour is essential.

What gadget can you not do without when you’re photographing/filming?
A camera of course!!

Where did you hear about the competition and the unearthed food in film award? How has winning the competition helped your career?
I saw it online. I don’t really know yet but definitely a great thing to have an award. I’m in talks with a food producer at the moment that is really keen to make an animation with me so that’s really exciting.

What is your favourite dish?
Unagi – a very special grilled Eel on rice you can only eat in specialised Unagi restaurants in Japan. It’s expensive so is a treat for us but not a pretentious meal ever, and unbelievably delicious when done nicely.

What’s your most memorable meal?
That’s a tough question to answer and to pick one!! My mums’ cooking is pretty memorable though. Always tasty, healthy and full of her thoughts and love for us.

Where in the world would you most like to eat?
I don’t like to admit this, but Japan. To me it’s the best cuisine and we have so much versatility. There’s a lot of regional food I’ve only read about and one day I’d like to travel more in Japan to taste it and get to know the culture around it.

For more details about Yuki, visit Jane Patick’s (her agent) site

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Jellied eels anyone?

When was the last time you tried something new? Poppies fish and chips in Camden

For me it was just last week when Carrie and I went to the brilliant Poppies fish and chips in Camden. We were off to talk to the Pink lady Food Photographer of the Year 2014 team about our food in film award. Poppies was the star of food in film finalist Georgia Glynn Smith’s ‘fish and chip’s film and so what better venue to reflect and de-brief on how our newly created award has gone?

Approach Poppies from the outside and you’re taken back in time. Step through the doors and the décor and the music takes you back to the 1940’s; the jukebox, the 6-seater bar and the front pull-down flush Thomas Crapper toilets (it’s all in the detail).

I won’t bore you with the detail of the meeting (which actually wasn’t boring at all) but the food was definitely on the top of our agenda.
The menu is jam packed and has everything you’d expect from a fish and chip shop, as well as more modern dishes such as calamari. But it is still very traditional and so in pride of place is Jellied Eels. This is something I’ve never tried, but felt like it was time to have a go – especially in such a nostalgic and traditional setting. Aside from offal I like and will eat anything so in the spirit of discovery I declared my intentions.

Within a short time the starter had appeared and I braced myself for the tasting. After last year’s 193 courses, there couldn’t be too much to be afraid of. Could there?

First off, the jelly. There was so much of it. A tentative taste and I dipped right in. Urgh, it felt like I was eating jellified seawater and actually the texture was the weird thing. As a child I loved jelly and ice cream, but a salty, savoury version wasn’t quite so nice.

Frankly it was a challenge to get through all the jelly to reach the eel itself. Imagining an eel in the water made me think it might be a slippery kind of meat but actually it was chunky, quite dense and a bit chewy, maybe a bit like tuna or swordfish. I quickly realised I need to avoid the bone and the skin! The taste wasn’t awful, but I wouldn’t rush to eat it again. A top tip (from the waiter) was to add vinegar. It certainly helped, but I’m afraid I was still left with a slightly muddy taste, so I chased it down with some good old bread and butter.

The rest of our meal passed without drama – the calamari, grilled fish and seafood platter were delicious, all served with perfect chips. The only word to describe the complementary sticky toffee puddings they gave us…AMAZING. Definitely one to recommend.

Something for everyone on the menu - PoppiesPoppies fish and chips in CamdenJust in case you forget where you are - PoppiesTraditional jellied eels - PoppiesCalamari and chips - PoppiesSticky toffee pudding - Poppies
Something for everyone on the menu
Poppies fish and chips in Camden
Just in case you forget where you are
Traditional jellied eels
Calamari and chips
Sticky toffee pudding

As for the 90 year old lady who religiously goes into Poppies each week for her jellied eels, I say “Madame you can keep your eels”. Despite the fact that Poppies serves a mean jellied eel, I’m not sure it’s for me. But it’s all about new experiences and I’ll #keepdiscovering.

Susie

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Don’t despair, some of us are coming back

We know people don’t like change and this month has been full of them.

We’ve made some adjustments to our sliced meat range (read blog post here), but also there are a few pesky products which have disappeared from sight.

It’s true that a few products are no longer available, but a number of them will be coming back! They will be sitting in a new section, with a range of other tapas products, from 17th June. You’ll see a few items back, such as:

  • Slow roasted sun drenched tomatoes
  • Free range spinach omelette
  • Free range chorizo omelette
  • Prosciutto Cotto
  • Italian cured meat selection
  • Chorizo meatballs
  • Tapas selection snap pack
  • Prawn and chorizo pinchos
  • Prawns with tomato and chilli
  • Squid-less rings

If you recognise them by the pack, have a look below….

unearthed slow roasted tomatoesunearthed free range spinach omeletteunearthed free range chorizo omeletteunearthed prosciutto cottounearthed Italian cured meat selectionunearthed chorizo meatballsunearthed tapas selection snap packunearthed King prawns and chorizo pinchosunearthed King prawns with tomato and chilliunearthed Squid-less rings
Slow roasted tomatoes
Free range spinach omelette
free range chorizo omelette
Prosciutto Cotto
Italian cured meat selection
chorizo meatballs
Tapas selection snap pack
King prawns and chorizo pinchos
King prawns with tomato and chilli
Squid-less rings

In the meantime, if you have any queries, please email Susie for more details -

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